Skip to Content

Blog Archives

Early Modern Spain at the Meadows

Meadows Museum gallery talks feature art research and perspectives from local guest speakers. Today’s presenter is Olivia Turner, curatorial assistant, Meadows Museum.

0 Continue Reading →

Digital Drawing from the Masters

Ian O’Brien, artistEnjoy afternoons of informal drawing instruction remotely over Zoom as artist Ian M. O’Brien leads you through a work of art in the Meadows Museum’s collection. Each session will provide an opportunity to explore a variety of techniques and improve drawing skills. Designed for adults and students ages 13 and older, and open to all abilities and experience levels.

0 Continue Reading →

Movies with the Meadows | ‘Fortuny. La muerte del pintor/Fortuny: The Death of the Painter’ (NR, 2020), directed by Emiliano Cano Díaz

Katharine Boswell, adjunct professor of women’s and gender studies, SMU
Movies with the Meadows pairs scholar and screen; these in-person film screenings are followed by a short talk in the museum’s auditorium. In celebration of the fifth anniversary of the acquisition of Mariano Fortuny y Marsal’s 1874 painting Beach at Portici, the Meadows Museum presents Fortuny. La muerte del pintor (Fortuny: The Death of the Painter). This film tracks the artist from the peak of his career to the effect of his untimely and sudden death on his family. The fascinating story of his sister-in-law, Isabel, also comes to light. Following the film, join Dr. Katharine Boswell for a talk that gives historical context to Isabel’s life and fate.

0 Continue Reading →

Drawing from the Masters

Ian O’Brien, artistEnjoy afternoons of informal drawing instruction as artist Ian O’Brien leads you through the Meadows Museum’s galleries. Each session will provide an opportunity to explore a variety of techniques and improve drawing skills. Designed for adults and students ages 15 and older, and open to all abilities and experience levels. Drawing materials will be available, but participants are encouraged to bring their own sketchpads and pencils. Free with regular museum admission; no advance registration required. Attendance is limited to 20 on a first-come, first-served basis.

0 Continue Reading →

Further Afield | In the Service of the Queen: Isabel of Castile as Patron and Collector

Jessica Weiss, associate professor of art history, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Further Afield virtual talks provides broader social, political, economic, and historical context for works of art at the museum. This spring Further Afield focuses on women as creators and patrons in Spain from medieval to modern times.

Isabel of Castile (1451–1504) was an incredibly active patron and collector. In addition to her sponsorship of architectural projects, the Spanish queen also accumulated a large collection of paintings, tapestries, metalwork, illuminated manuscripts, and other luxury goods. Like many other rulers, Isabel manipulated her personal collection into sumptuous displays visible to a wide audience that included both local courtiers and international diplomats. Because the goal of such spectacles was self-promotion, the study of the spaces and objects associated with Isabel reveals her political agenda and persuasive strategies.

0 Continue Reading →

Digital Drawing from the Masters

Ian O’Brien, artistEnjoy afternoons of informal drawing instruction remotely over Zoom as artist Ian M. O’Brien leads you through a work of art in the Meadows Museum’s collection. Each session will provide an opportunity to explore a variety of techniques and improve drawing skills. Designed for adults and students ages 13 and older, and open to all abilities and experience levels.

0 Continue Reading →

Meadows Museum Movie Night – The Sandlot (PG, 1993) – POSTPONED

POSTPONED DUE TO HIGH WINDS, NEW DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED

Named “Best Outdoor Film Screening” by the Dallas Observer for 2021! Enjoy a night under the stars with the Meadows Museum. We’ll screen The Sandlot, a family favorite about a group of young baseball players during the summer of 1962. Pull up a blanket or lawn chair and bring a picnic to enjoy. Tickets are $5 for members, $10 for non-members, and kids under 12 are free with a paid adult admission.

0 0 Continue Reading →

From Riches to Rags: Fashion and Storytelling in Murillo’s Prodigal Son Series

Meadows Museum gallery talks feature art research and perspectives from local guest speakers. Today’s presenter is Rebecca Teresi, art historian.

0 Continue Reading →

Further Afield | Feminist Art History: Medieval to Museums

Jitske Jasperse, professor, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin
Further Afield virtual talks provides broader social, political, economic, and historical context for works of art at the museum. This spring Further Afield focuses on women as creators and patrons in Spain from medieval to modern times.

In 1962, the art historian H.W. Janson banned women from his famous handbook The History of Art, writing them out of a broadly distributed text that influenced the art historical canon. Today, thanks to the many art historians and artists who have focused on women artists, we have a rich body of scholarship in feminist art history. This talk will focus on women artists—including Francisca Efigenia Meléndez y Durazzo, whose work is in the Meadows’s collection—and present key ideas within feminist art history. It will also address stunning medieval textiles at San Isidoro de Léon, Spain, demonstrating the multiple ways that medieval women were, in fact, makers of art.

0 Continue Reading →

Luis Martín Lecture Series in the Humanities | Feasting and Fasting in Early Modern Spain

Jodi Campbell, professor, Department of History, Texas Christian University

Tripe and sweetbread, ginger and cinnamon, and figs and pomegranates. Just as early modern Spaniards selected their clothing to project a particular image, so too did they dress their tables with carefully chosen ingredients and elaborate preparations. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, food was far more than just sustenance: Spaniards used it to cure disease, solidify connections in the community, perform religious identity, and enhance their social status. Different foods were suited to particular people and situations: radishes and cheese were good foods for students, and if one suffered from melancholy, cooked vegetables were a good cure. What one ate was also a moral choice, as a preference for fish was a sign of virtue, while too much indulgence in flesh and wine—as Murillo’s Prodigal Son seems to embrace at his feast—was a sign of wastefulness and gluttony. In exploring the kinds of foods early modern Spaniards ate, this series of lectures will illuminate how food was used for more than nourishment: to compete for social status, as a crucial expression of religious identity, and as a means to solidify connections between individuals and groups.
This program is made possible by gifts from the Fannie and Stephen Kahn Charitable Foundation and the Eugene McDermott Foundation.

This lecture series is presented in person and virtually.

0 Continue Reading →